Story Over Sin Applied

At the end of the Goblet of Fire, upon the return of Lord Voldemort, Dumbledore says to Harry, “dark and terrible times lie ahead, where we must choose between what is right and what is easy.”

We face that same choice in our daily life when it comes to our interaction with others; we can choose what is right, or what is easy.

We are flooded with false narratives which attempt to guide us in making the easy choice. I mention five in my last post. Whether you are a Christian, or not, these narratives affect your priorities and ultimately your beliefs.

Ephesians 2:1-10 radically reorients the believer’s life to God’s story. What is amazing is that God does not just save us to himself, but you can see in verse ten that God is releasing us to do good works–responding to the story God has initiated. In essence, this story becomes elevated over every other narrative.

As we apply the value story over sin to our actions, story over sin forces us to change how we relate to others. It’s easy to point out the sin/brokenness/wrong actions of others. While we may never publicly or verbally comment on the sin of others, we can recognize it. What is not so easy is to hear the story of another. Carl Lentz of Hillsong NYC does a masterful job of communicating this value in the public square on the View.

 

Before you pass judgment on Lentz’s response, I would like you to consider the rest of my post. I believe Lentz does a remarkable job, not because he “avoids” the question, but because he attempts to address the motivations behind the question. Further, as a Christian, Lentz does not have to point out the sin because he already knows how non-believers have exchanged the truth of God for a lie (Romans 1:25). In fact, we all still exchange truth for a lie and fall short (Romans 3:23).

Therefore, Christians should have the courage to hear someone’s story over dinner, coffee, a beer before you point out their sin.

Story over sin changes what you see: Real people who have a real story.

If you have ever traveled, and you are a cheapskate like me, you take a week’s worth of clothes and fit it into a carry-on bag. The appearance is that my trip will just be a few days when in reality it is supposed to last a whole week. Never mistake a tightly packed bag for everything in the bag. It is impossible to look at a bag and know what is inside until it is unpacked.

download-6When you interact with another you may see the metaphorical “carry-on bag.” Someone sin is the bag, but as it opened you realize there is a ton of stuff inside. There is more than meets the eye. Every time we meet someone on their journey, it is wisest to allow them to unpack their bag. It takes time for any tightly packed bag to be unpacked. Let me say again, this is not a quick thing. People are not going to just open up the bag and show you their delicates or their dirty laundry. In fact, it would be rude for you to grab the bag and just open it. To choose story over sin is to patiently sit with them until they unpack it.

How does that happen? By you sharing your story, allowing them to see your bag, and also what is inside it. When you tell your story about how God brought you from death to life, you communicate the good news of rescue and redemption. If you have never written down that moment or marathon of God working in your life, then take some time to write it down.

As you share all the baggage you have, it is imperative you know God’s story. A Christian’s story is not how they cleaned themselves up, and instead how God brought past change and is still changing us. There is a great resource to work through called The Gospel Primer if you are not sure how to do this.

Our task is to point them to God’s story not point out their sin. When their story is caught up in God’s story to change happens. Jesus came to seek and save. He doesn’t expect us to become the saviors, rather live in response to the story of the savior.

Jesus is better than any strategy or behavior modification. He is more able to bring real, lasting, heart-level change. He is the greatest missionary ever. Jesus is better. He’s better than you. He’s better than your pastor. He’s better than anyone or anything else. His story overcomes our sin.